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Julian Assange's Internet Disabled At The Ecuador Embassy In London

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The Ecuador Embassy in London has disabled Julian Assange’s outside communications, officials have confirmed.

The Embassy announced on Wednesday they were taking the measure in response to the WikiLeaks founder’s recent activity on social media.

Assange has been living inside the Embassy in the UK capital since June 2012, when he entered the building to avoid extradition to Sweden to face questioning about allegations of sex crimes, which he has always denied.

Officials previously cut off his internet access in 2016 and tweeted confirmation his internet connection has been disabled again.

As part of an agreement between Assange and the Ecuadorean government, he is not permitted to send any messages that could interfere with the South American nation’s relations with other countries.

Ecuador gave him asylum after he sought refuge in the embassy to avoid extradition to Sweden for investigation of sex-related claims.

Sweden dropped the case, but Mr Assange remains subject to arrest in Britain for jumping bail.

Kim Dotcom, a former owner of file-sharing company Megaupload, had earlier suggested the WikiLeaks founder’s communications had been suspended, and urged Assange’s supporters to gather outside the Embassy. 

Former Greek minister Yanis Varoufakis and musician Brian Eno said in a statement they had heard “with great concern” about the lost internet access and ban on visitors.

“Only extraordinary pressure from the US and the Spanish governments can explain why Ecuador’s authorities should have taken such appalling steps in isolating Julian,” they said.

They added that the Ecuador government had only recently granted Mr Assange citizenship, saying it must have been “leaned on mercilessly” to stop attempting to provide a diplomatic route to safety and even drive the WikiLeaks founder out of the embassy.

“Clearly, Ecuador’s government has been subjected to bullying over its decision to grant Julian asylum, support and ultimately, diplomatic status.”

Foreign Office Minister Sir Alan Duncan branded Assange a “miserable little worm” during a Commons debate on Tuesday, adding he should leave the Ecuadorean embassy and surrender to British justice.

Assange replied: “Britain should come clean on whether it intends to extradite me to the United States for publishing the truth and cease its ongoing violation of the UN rulings in this matter.

“If it does this disgraceful impasse can be resolved tomorrow. I have already fully served any theoretical (I haven’t been charged) “bail violation” whilst in prison and under house arrest. So why is there a warrant for my arrest?”



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lywyn
22 days ago
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Its ok for him to make sneaky deals and pass data to the Trump's. He's a hypocrite and should stop pretending he's doing anything for anyone but himself
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Stop Using The Same Password And Download One Of These Apps

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A new report by the government has revealed that a startling number of us are still using the same password for multiple online accounts.

Creating and managing a strong set of passwords is always the first thing we don’t do when it comes to our own cybersecurity. Mostly because it’s actually pretty unreasonable to expect us to remember 27 different passwords, all of which have to be unhackable.

Then of course there’s the feeling that ‘well I haven’t been hacked yet so clearly I don’t need to worry.’

 

Well we’re here to tell you there’s a better way than constantly having to reset all your passwords because you keep forgetting them, and that is by using a password manager.

What is a password manager?

It’s an app that can create and store all of your passwords within a secure, encrypted folder located in the cloud.

All you have to do is remember one master password and then every time you need to login in to a website or app you’ll only need to remember that one.

Now if entering one long master password sounds like a chore consider these two points:

1. It isn’t actually that much of a chore compared to remembering 27 passwords, most of which you’ll have to reset because you’ve forgotten them.

2. Most smartphones have fingerprint sensors which can be used to unlock your password manager, making it even easier and more convenient to access all your stored passwords.

What are the best password managers?

Dashlane

Dashlane is in many ways the gold-standard of password managers. It's free to use on a single device and comes with a dizzying array of features. Not only will it generate powerful passwords for you, but it'll automatically save them when you create a new online account. Finally it'll store your credit card information and any secure notes you want kept safe. It's compatible with Touch ID, Face ID and fingerprint readers on Android smartphones.
Price: Free (1 device)/$39.99 per year (unlimited devices)

1Password

1Password is for those that use lots of devices across lots of different operating systems. It will work with literally anything. It offers many of the same options as Dashlane but also boasts an array of browser plug-ins that will let you access your passwords through Chrome, Safari or Firefox and log in automatically. No it's not free but its basic package is cheaper than Dashlane and supports one account on all your devices. It too supports fingerprint and Face ID logins.
Price: $2.99 per month (Unlimited devices)

Keeper Security

Keeper might not look as swanky as the others but it's by far and away the best one for business users. It lets you record your previous passwords and see when any and all changes have been made to the account. Finally, Keeper also supports physical security keys letting you add another layer of protection in addition to your master password and fingerprint sensor.
Price: £20.99 per year (unlimited devices)

LastPass

Finally, there's LastPass. Looking like Netflix for your cybersecurity this free password manager has the simplest layout and offers solid basic password management if you're after a no-frills approach. Like Dashlane, the free version only works on a single device so if you're looking for something that'll work across your devices then we would recommend upgrading to Premium.
Price: Free (1 device)/$2 per month (Unlimited devices)


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lywyn
57 days ago
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Bad reporting, LastPass does everything Dashlane does and more, at less cost.
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Tinder Is Planning Feature For Women That Stops Men From Messaging First

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Tinder has become the latest big player to try and do something to change negative perceptions around dating apps by adopting a feature that will prevent men from messaging first. It is no secret that the world of dating apps can be a hostile environment, with unsolicited messages, dick pics and aggressive pick-up lines accepted by many as par for the course in the search for love. The tool, which would give women users more power, is working on the same premise as rival app Bumble, that a female-led conversation is less likely to end with one of the unwanted conclusions listed above. Mandy Ginsberg, chief executive of the Match group who own Tinder, told MarketWatch that the move was not a “reaction” to a competitor but will differ from anything else on the market (e.g Bumble) as the feature will be opt-in rather than a mandatory setting. In short, if women want to have the option, it is there. But not compulsory. Ginsberg said: “Often, women don’t really want the pressure of kicking off the conversation, but if they want it, that’s great.” Research published in November last year found that Tinder has 38% of female users and 62% of male users. “We have to constantly listen to what women want and address their needs, not just on Tinder but on all products,” she said. Match also owns Match.com and OkCupid. Bumble was launched by Tinder co-founder Whitney Wolfe Herd in 2012, after she left the company and sued for sexual harassment and discrimination. She reportedly received a $1,000,000 settlement. For the time being the feature seems to only apply to heterosexual users (in the male-female interactions) and there is no word on wider application.





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lywyn
63 days ago
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Equals right for them, and extra benefits. It's not always equal
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Apple Music Was Always Going To Win

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Apple Music is about to overtake Spotify as the most popular streaming music service in the United States, the Wall Street Journal reported over the weekend. Gizmodo: [...] Here's where the inevitability comes into play. Because all Apple devices come preloaded with Apple Music, countless consumers start using Apple Music without knowing any better. It's effectively become the streaming music analogue of Microsoft pushing people to surf the web with Internet Explorer. The big difference is that people eventually have to pay for Apple Music, which is the same price as Spotify. As many suspected when it launched three years ago, Apple Music was bound to succeed simply because Apple is big enough and rich enough to will it so. Think about it this way: Spotify gained traction quickly after its 2011 launch, largely because music enthusiasts had seen its streaming model succeed globally and wanted to try this neat new thing. After all, there wasn't anything quite like it at the time, and Americans love to feel innovative. But eventually, Spotify would cease to feel special and new. As the years passed, practically every major tech company launched its own music streaming service. And then, in 2015, Apple unveiled Apple Music in 2015 -- which was really just a rebranded version of Beats Music. Because Apple could preload the service on iPhones, Watches, and Macs, the company could effectively tap into a new revenue stream without actually inventing anything.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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lywyn
73 days ago
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Google get slammed and fined for giving priority of their services over others on Android. Apple get a pat on the back.
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Washington state: Comcast was “even more deceptive” than we thought

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Enlarge (credit: Comcast)

The Attorney General of Washington has filed a new amended complaint in an ongoing lawsuit against Comcast, claiming that "new evidence" reveals "even more deceptive conduct than previously alleged."

The lawsuit, which was initially submitted in August 2016, alleged that hundreds of thousands of Washington residents were "deceived" into paying "at least $73 million in subscription fees over the last five years for a near-worthless ‘protection plan.’"

According to the amended complaint, which was filed in King County Superior Court on Thursday, newly obtained recorded calls between Comcast and its Washington customers who subscribed to its "Service Protection Plan" show "that Comcast may have signed up more than half of all SPP subscribers without their consent. Comcast deceived consumers even when mentioning the SPP, telling them the SPP plan was ‘free’ when they signed up, when in fact, Comcast would automatically charge them every month after the first month."

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lywyn
118 days ago
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With pesky net neutrality out the way they can censor these articles and keep customers in the dark
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Ikea's Stuff is Tough To Assemble, So It Bought a Startup To Do It For You

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One of the most popular jobs on TaskRabbit, a service that lets you hire workers for quick gigs, is assembling Ikea furniture. So perhaps it's no surprise that the Swedish retail giant has acquired the startup for an undisclosed price. From a report: For now, TaskRabbit services -- where each worker sets their own rates but the company takes 20 percent -- are available in 40 American cities and in London. The majority of its American workers (or "taskers" as the company dubs them) do not receive any health or retirement benefits, as is typical in so-called "gig economy" jobs. While TaskRabbit itself has not been sued in federal court by any of its workers so far, other companies in the industry have been -- numerous labor cases filed against Uber were recently heard at the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeal in San Francisco. It seems unlikely that Swedish business culture will have any impact on TaskRabbit's workers, the overwhelming majority of whom are ad hoc contractors. Sweden, which generally lacks a similar "gig economy" environment, boasts universal public health care and housing and child care subsidies. Employees in Sweden are required to be provided a minimum of five weeks paid annual leave, and wages are typically set by annual collective bargaining. According to Ikea's statement, TaskRabbit will remain an independent company and will remain in San Francisco -- as such, its taskers aren't considered to be employees.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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lywyn
203 days ago
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Slashdot is now another news lister? That article title is ripped directly from Ars Technica
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